Bilder aus der Forschung

Bilder aus der Forschung

<p>Eine Frau bemalt einen traditionellen Bambusschirm in Pathein, Myanmar. Die Stadt ist im ganzen Land bekannt für die Produktion der Schirme, die hier seit Generationen handgefertigt werden.<br /><br />Foto: Laura Hornig, Pathein, Myanmar, 2016<br />Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Eine Frau bemalt einen traditionellen Bambusschirm in Pathein, Myanmar. Die Stadt ist im ganzen Land bekannt für die Produktion der Schirme, die hier seit Generationen handgefertigt werden.

Foto: Laura Hornig, Pathein, Myanmar, 2016
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>Boat building in Jāffarābād, a port town along the Saurāshtrā coast of Gujarāt, India. One summer morning in March 2015 during the boat building season. The Saurāshtrā coastline along the Arabian Sea has a long tradition of building wooden boats.<br /><br />Photo: Varsha Patel, Jāffarābād, Gujarāt, India, 2015<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Boat building in Jāffarābād, a port town along the Saurāshtrā coast of Gujarāt, India. One summer morning in March 2015 during the boat building season. The Saurāshtrā coastline along the Arabian Sea has a long tradition of building wooden boats.

Photo: Varsha Patel, Jāffarābād, Gujarāt, India, 2015
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Woman picking cotton in a field near the Maqtaly village. The name of the village <em>Maqtaly</em> in Kazak means ‘Cottony’. This is a seasonal work and many otherwise unemployed villagers earn money by picking cotton from mid-September to the end of November.<br /><br />Photo: Indira Alibayeva, Maqtaly, Kazakhstan, 2014<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Woman picking cotton in a field near the Maqtaly village. The name of the village Maqtaly in Kazak means ‘Cottony’. This is a seasonal work and many otherwise unemployed villagers earn money by picking cotton from mid-September to the end of November.

Photo: Indira Alibayeva, Maqtaly, Kazakhstan, 2014
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>A <em>pūjeca tāṭ</em>. The contents of this plate – incense sticks, marigold flowers, an oil lamp, sugar, gulal, kumkum, turmeric powder, and rice – are used during ritualistic ceremonies to worship a deity.<br /><br />Photo: Kalindi Kokal, Paaj Pandhari, Maharashtra, India, 2015<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

A pūjeca tāṭ. The contents of this plate – incense sticks, marigold flowers, an oil lamp, sugar, gulal, kumkum, turmeric powder, and rice – are used during ritualistic ceremonies to worship a deity.

Photo: Kalindi Kokal, Paaj Pandhari, Maharashtra, India, 2015
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>The <em>geerewol</em> dance is performed during a Woɗaaɓe inter-clan ceremony. Central to these ceremonies is the ritual affirmation of a culture-specific practice of marriage by elopement of already married women with men from other clans. Although the practice is the cause of many conflicts, it is – through the resulting bonds across clans – also the social glue that ties the mobile and spatially dispersed clans together.<br /><br />Photo: Florian Köhler, Abdenaser, Damergou Region, Niger, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

The geerewol dance is performed during a Woɗaaɓe inter-clan ceremony. Central to these ceremonies is the ritual affirmation of a culture-specific practice of marriage by elopement of already married women with men from other clans. Although the practice is the cause of many conflicts, it is – through the resulting bonds across clans – also the social glue that ties the mobile and spatially dispersed clans together.

Photo: Florian Köhler, Abdenaser, Damergou Region, Niger, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Nyonya beaded shoes and slippers belong to the material culture of the Baba Nyonya or Strait Chinese, who are unique to the former British Straits Settlements Penang, Melaka, and Singapore. To bead shoes was part of the handcraft a young girl had to learn before marriage. Today, there are only a handful of craftsmen and -women left making these customised shoes.<br /><br />Photo: Mareike Pampus, George Town (Penang), Malaysia, 2015<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Nyonya beaded shoes and slippers belong to the material culture of the Baba Nyonya or Strait Chinese, who are unique to the former British Straits Settlements Penang, Melaka, and Singapore. To bead shoes was part of the handcraft a young girl had to learn before marriage. Today, there are only a handful of craftsmen and -women left making these customised shoes.

Photo: Mareike Pampus, George Town (Penang), Malaysia, 2015
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Since 2012, Penang’s Street Art is one of the main attractions for young tourists in George Town. Its affordance-character invites the visitor to become part of the art. Following this request the two backpackers Erfino from Indonesia and Tony from California join the picture.<br /><br />Photo: Mareike Pampus, George Town, Penang, Malaysia, 2015<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Since 2012, Penang’s Street Art is one of the main attractions for young tourists in George Town. Its affordance-character invites the visitor to become part of the art. Following this request the two backpackers Erfino from Indonesia and Tony from California join the picture.

Photo: Mareike Pampus, George Town, Penang, Malaysia, 2015
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
Accra, Ghana, 2011<br /><br />Photo: Jacqueline Knörr, Accra, Ghana, 2011<br />Research Group ‘Integration and Conflict along the Upper Guinea Coast (West Africa)’<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology Bild vergrößern
Accra, Ghana, 2011

Photo: Jacqueline Knörr, Accra, Ghana, 2011
Research Group ‘Integration and Conflict along the Upper Guinea Coast (West Africa)’
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology [weniger]
<p>Currently the compass of a fishing boat, it was previously used in sail boats called <em>vāhan</em> in the Gujarāti language. These were employed in local and medium distance coastal trade along the shores of Western India till 2011.<br /><br />Photo: Varsha Patel, Port village of Goghā, Gulf of Khambhat, Gujarāt, India, 2015<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Currently the compass of a fishing boat, it was previously used in sail boats called vāhan in the Gujarāti language. These were employed in local and medium distance coastal trade along the shores of Western India till 2011.

Photo: Varsha Patel, Port village of Goghā, Gulf of Khambhat, Gujarāt, India, 2015
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>In Anpassung an die Ressourcenkargheit des nördlichen Sahel leben die Woɗaaɓe in Niger – bis heute oft höchst mobile, Rinder haltende Pastoralisten – für einen Großteil des Jahres in verstreuten Kleingruppen. Die jährlichen großen Klantreffen sind ein Anlass, sich im Tanz zu messen, jedoch auch, um soziale Beziehungen zu bekräftigen und Freundschaften zu erneuern.<br /><br />Foto: Florian Köhler, Abdenaser, Damergou Region, Niger, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

In Anpassung an die Ressourcenkargheit des nördlichen Sahel leben die Woɗaaɓe in Niger – bis heute oft höchst mobile, Rinder haltende Pastoralisten – für einen Großteil des Jahres in verstreuten Kleingruppen. Die jährlichen großen Klantreffen sind ein Anlass, sich im Tanz zu messen, jedoch auch, um soziale Beziehungen zu bekräftigen und Freundschaften zu erneuern.

Foto: Florian Köhler, Abdenaser, Damergou Region, Niger, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>Was aussieht wie ein Kunstobjekt, sind Feuerlöscheimer am Eingang eines teuren Safari-Camps im Norden Kenias. Ganz wartungs- und verdunstungsfrei sind die Eimer mit Sand gefüllt. Man erwartet offensichtlich nur kleine Feuer.<br /><br />Foto: Harald Müller-Dempf, Lokochokio, Kenia, 2006<br />Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Was aussieht wie ein Kunstobjekt, sind Feuerlöscheimer am Eingang eines teuren Safari-Camps im Norden Kenias. Ganz wartungs- und verdunstungsfrei sind die Eimer mit Sand gefüllt. Man erwartet offensichtlich nur kleine Feuer.

Foto: Harald Müller-Dempf, Lokochokio, Kenia, 2006
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>Buddhism plays a big role in the religious landscape of Sikkim where such prayer flags are a common sight. These monochromatic flags are inscribed with prayers, mantras, or symbols. The colours represent the elements – fire, water, earth, air, space – of the physical body and environment. It is believed that the wind activates and carries the spiritual vibrations from the flags to the surroundings.<br /><br />Photo: Sudeshna Chaki, Khecheopalri Lake, Sikkim, India, 2014<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Buddhism plays a big role in the religious landscape of Sikkim where such prayer flags are a common sight. These monochromatic flags are inscribed with prayers, mantras, or symbols. The colours represent the elements – fire, water, earth, air, space – of the physical body and environment. It is believed that the wind activates and carries the spiritual vibrations from the flags to the surroundings.

Photo: Sudeshna Chaki, Khecheopalri Lake, Sikkim, India, 2014
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>A <em>puchiāri</em> presents her analysis of the rice grains placed before her by a family. <em>Puchiāri-s</em> are consulted to know whether misfortunes being faced by the family are the result of an intervention by spirits or deities. In the majority of the cases deities are called upon by disputing parties for suitable processing of their disputes.<br /><br />Photo: Kalindi Kokal, Saukuda village, Uttarakhand, India, 2016<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

A puchiāri presents her analysis of the rice grains placed before her by a family. Puchiāri-s are consulted to know whether misfortunes being faced by the family are the result of an intervention by spirits or deities. In the majority of the cases deities are called upon by disputing parties for suitable processing of their disputes.

Photo: Kalindi Kokal, Saukuda village, Uttarakhand, India, 2016
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Donation boxes in Soon U Ponya Shin Pagoda, Sagaing, with the Pagoda’s main Buddha statue in the background. Sagaing is the religious centre of Myanmar. It hosts thousands of monks and nuns who study and meditate in the countless Buddhist monasteries. The Pagodas of Sagaing also attract many pilgrims and foreign visitors.<br /><br />Photo: Laura Hornig, Sagaing, Myanmar, 2016<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Donation boxes in Soon U Ponya Shin Pagoda, Sagaing, with the Pagoda’s main Buddha statue in the background. Sagaing is the religious centre of Myanmar. It hosts thousands of monks and nuns who study and meditate in the countless Buddhist monasteries. The Pagodas of Sagaing also attract many pilgrims and foreign visitors.

Photo: Laura Hornig, Sagaing, Myanmar, 2016
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
Eine junge Akha-Frau f&auml;ngt Fische in einem Fluss im S&uuml;dwesten der chinesischen Provinz Yunnan. Sie ist 18 Jahre alt und hat einen einj&auml;hrigen Sohn. Sie liebt es zu tanzen, aber seit ihrer Hochzeit kann sie ihr Hobby nicht mehr so oft pflegen.<br /><br />Photo: Ruijing Wang, Menglian, China, 2012<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung Bild vergrößern
Eine junge Akha-Frau fängt Fische in einem Fluss im Südwesten der chinesischen Provinz Yunnan. Sie ist 18 Jahre alt und hat einen einjährigen Sohn. Sie liebt es zu tanzen, aber seit ihrer Hochzeit kann sie ihr Hobby nicht mehr so oft pflegen.

Photo: Ruijing Wang, Menglian, China, 2012
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung [weniger]
Die Buduma, die die Uferregion und die Inseln des Tschadsees bewohnen, sind Pastoralisten, Maisbauern und Fischer. Je nach Wasserstand des Sees ist es f&uuml;r die Rinderhirten manchmal notwendig, mit ihrer Herde zu schwimmen, um sie auf einer Insel zur Weide zu f&uuml;hren.<br /><br />Photo: Florian K&ouml;hler, Tschadsee bei Bosso, Niger, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung Bild vergrößern
Die Buduma, die die Uferregion und die Inseln des Tschadsees bewohnen, sind Pastoralisten, Maisbauern und Fischer. Je nach Wasserstand des Sees ist es für die Rinderhirten manchmal notwendig, mit ihrer Herde zu schwimmen, um sie auf einer Insel zur Weide zu führen.

Photo: Florian Köhler, Tschadsee bei Bosso, Niger, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung [weniger]
Die Zubereitung und das gemeinsame Trinken von Tee sind im westafrikanischen Niger ein soziales Ritual. Diese Teekanne eines Fulɓe-Hirten stammt noch aus der Tschechoslowakei. Die Verzierungen wurden von einem Tuareg Silberschmied ausgef&uuml;hrt und der Tee stammt aus China.<br /><br />Photo: Florian K&ouml;hler, Ganatcha, Niger, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung Bild vergrößern
Die Zubereitung und das gemeinsame Trinken von Tee sind im westafrikanischen Niger ein soziales Ritual. Diese Teekanne eines Fulɓe-Hirten stammt noch aus der Tschechoslowakei. Die Verzierungen wurden von einem Tuareg Silberschmied ausgeführt und der Tee stammt aus China.

Photo: Florian Köhler, Ganatcha, Niger, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung [weniger]
Die Region Dzūkija ist bekannt f&uuml;r ihre pilzreichen W&auml;lder. Diese s&uuml;&szlig;en Pilze sind eine kulinarische Spezialit&auml;t einer Frau aus der Region.<br /><br />Photo: Lina Pranaitytė-Wergin, Region Dzūkija, Litauen, 2008<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung Bild vergrößern
Die Region Dzūkija ist bekannt für ihre pilzreichen Wälder. Diese süßen Pilze sind eine kulinarische Spezialität einer Frau aus der Region.

Photo: Lina Pranaitytė-Wergin, Region Dzūkija, Litauen, 2008
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung [weniger]
<p>Eine Piroge transportiert eine Piroge. In der unzug&auml;nglichen Inselwelt des nigrischen Tschadsees sind die flachen Boote das einzige geeignete Fortbewegungs- und Transportmittel.<br /><br />Photo: Florian K&ouml;hler, Tschadsee bei Bosso, Niger, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Eine Piroge transportiert eine Piroge. In der unzugänglichen Inselwelt des nigrischen Tschadsees sind die flachen Boote das einzige geeignete Fortbewegungs- und Transportmittel.

Photo: Florian Köhler, Tschadsee bei Bosso, Niger, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>Mittagspause unter Freunden. Jede Werkstatt in der Kohlenwaschanlage hat ihr eigenes Haustier. Murr lebt schon seit 14 Jahren im Kesselraum.<br /><br />Photo: Eeva Kesk&uuml;la, Karaganda Oblast, Kasachstan, 2013<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Mittagspause unter Freunden. Jede Werkstatt in der Kohlenwaschanlage hat ihr eigenes Haustier. Murr lebt schon seit 14 Jahren im Kesselraum.

Photo: Eeva Kesküla, Karaganda Oblast, Kasachstan, 2013
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>An Akha woman in her eighties smoking a bamboo pipe. She is a respected and loved grandmother and mother to 11 children. The Akha are highlanders, scattered across the Ailao Mountains between the Mekong River and the Red River, and comprise a total population of 680,000.<br /><br />Photo: Ruijing Wang, Menglian, China, 2012<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

An Akha woman in her eighties smoking a bamboo pipe. She is a respected and loved grandmother and mother to 11 children. The Akha are highlanders, scattered across the Ailao Mountains between the Mekong River and the Red River, and comprise a total population of 680,000.

Photo: Ruijing Wang, Menglian, China, 2012
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>On Women&rsquo;s Day, 8 March 2013, the well-dressed Akha women took one day off work and enjoyed their holiday. They visited the sugar factory, a mansion of the late Dai chieftain and went trekking in a park located on the outskirt of the town. All costs of food, drink, and transportation were covered by the local government. In the park, they climbed up the rock and asked me to take the photo.<br /><br />Photo: Ruijing Wang, Menglian, China, 2013<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

On Women’s Day, 8 March 2013, the well-dressed Akha women took one day off work and enjoyed their holiday. They visited the sugar factory, a mansion of the late Dai chieftain and went trekking in a park located on the outskirt of the town. All costs of food, drink, and transportation were covered by the local government. In the park, they climbed up the rock and asked me to take the photo.

Photo: Ruijing Wang, Menglian, China, 2013
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Fishermen on Lake Chad. In the labyrinth-like islands along the Lake Chad shores, shallow waterways are stacked from side to side with fish traps, emptied in regular intervals.<br /><br />Photo: Florian K&ouml;hler, Lake Chad, near Bosso, Niger, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Fishermen on Lake Chad. In the labyrinth-like islands along the Lake Chad shores, shallow waterways are stacked from side to side with fish traps, emptied in regular intervals.

Photo: Florian Köhler, Lake Chad, near Bosso, Niger, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Turkana-Nomaden sind Meister darin, einer harten Umwelt ein selbstbestimmtes Leben abzuringen, aber ein Jahrhundert Modernisierungspolitik und Bev&ouml;lkerungsexplosion trieb eine Mehrheit in eine transfer-abh&auml;ngige sesshafte Daseinsform mit Schulen, Christianisierung und Nahrungshilfe, zu der auch die Gefl&uuml;gelhaltung geh&ouml;rt. Dieser stolze Hahn hatte die Ehre, dem neuen Brauch des Weihnachtsfestes als Opfer dienen zu d&uuml;rfen.<br /><br />Photo: Immo Eulenberger, Kenia, 2013<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Turkana-Nomaden sind Meister darin, einer harten Umwelt ein selbstbestimmtes Leben abzuringen, aber ein Jahrhundert Modernisierungspolitik und Bevölkerungsexplosion trieb eine Mehrheit in eine transfer-abhängige sesshafte Daseinsform mit Schulen, Christianisierung und Nahrungshilfe, zu der auch die Geflügelhaltung gehört. Dieser stolze Hahn hatte die Ehre, dem neuen Brauch des Weihnachtsfestes als Opfer dienen zu dürfen.

Photo: Immo Eulenberger, Kenia, 2013
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>Motorbikes and scooters are an important means of transport and mobility in contemporary Vietnam. This wall painting in the old quarter of Hanoi may seem a bit exaggerated, but it is in fact not all too far from the reality of everyday street life. The only exception: so far children below the age of six have not been required by law to wear a helmet.<br /><br />Photo: Kirsten Endres, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2013<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Motorbikes and scooters are an important means of transport and mobility in contemporary Vietnam. This wall painting in the old quarter of Hanoi may seem a bit exaggerated, but it is in fact not all too far from the reality of everyday street life. The only exception: so far children below the age of six have not been required by law to wear a helmet.

Photo: Kirsten Endres, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2013
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>The many rivers in the mountainous north of Laos are important for the livelihoods of the heterogeneous population. Lao, Tai Dam, Tai Daeng, Khmu and many other ethnic groups use those rivers for fishing and to irrigate their small rice fields next to the river banks.<br /><br />Photo: Oliver Tappe, Sam Tai District, Lao PDR, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

The many rivers in the mountainous north of Laos are important for the livelihoods of the heterogeneous population. Lao, Tai Dam, Tai Daeng, Khmu and many other ethnic groups use those rivers for fishing and to irrigate their small rice fields next to the river banks.

Photo: Oliver Tappe, Sam Tai District, Lao PDR, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>The children of Khorog prepare a theatrical event for the celebration of the <em>Idi Nur</em> &ndash; the Holiday of Light, the commemoration of Aga Khan IV first visit to the region. They decided spontaneously to surprise the elders. They dressed up and invited all the neighbourhood to join the recitations of religious texts, singing, reciting poems in English, and dancing to traditional and disco music.<br /><br />Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Khorog, Tajikistan, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

The children of Khorog prepare a theatrical event for the celebration of the Idi Nur – the Holiday of Light, the commemoration of Aga Khan IV first visit to the region. They decided spontaneously to surprise the elders. They dressed up and invited all the neighbourhood to join the recitations of religious texts, singing, reciting poems in English, and dancing to traditional and disco music.

Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Khorog, Tajikistan, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Bulgarians are one of the many ethnic minorities living in Ukraine&rsquo;s Black Sea region. Folklore groups from across southwestern Ukraine meet for the &ldquo;Day of Bulgarian Culture&rdquo;.<br /><br />Photo: Simon Schlegel, Odessa, Ukraine, 2013<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Bulgarians are one of the many ethnic minorities living in Ukraine’s Black Sea region. Folklore groups from across southwestern Ukraine meet for the “Day of Bulgarian Culture”.

Photo: Simon Schlegel, Odessa, Ukraine, 2013
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
The lift operator greets miners, who have worked their 6 hours shift underground and are taking the lift up from 1000 meters below. They will wash off the coal dust, but it will not come off from around their eyes. So everyone in the town knows that the men who seem to have kohl eyeliner around their eyes have spent their shift doing hard work. <br /><br />Photo: Eeva Kesk&uuml;la, Karaganda Oblast, Kazakhstan, 2014<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology Bild vergrößern
The lift operator greets miners, who have worked their 6 hours shift underground and are taking the lift up from 1000 meters below. They will wash off the coal dust, but it will not come off from around their eyes. So everyone in the town knows that the men who seem to have kohl eyeliner around their eyes have spent their shift doing hard work.

Photo: Eeva Kesküla, Karaganda Oblast, Kazakhstan, 2014
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology [weniger]
<p>The January masquerade, originally a rural tradition, is also performed in the industrial town Pernik since the 1960s. While in the rural context this ritual is associated with fertility and with a prosperous harvest, in the urban context it is also associated, by industrial workers, with luck for the New Year and with a safe production.<br /><br />Photo: Dimitra Kofti, Pernik, Bulgaria, 2014<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

The January masquerade, originally a rural tradition, is also performed in the industrial town Pernik since the 1960s. While in the rural context this ritual is associated with fertility and with a prosperous harvest, in the urban context it is also associated, by industrial workers, with luck for the New Year and with a safe production.

Photo: Dimitra Kofti, Pernik, Bulgaria, 2014
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Coke oven operator. Arcelor Mittal Steel Plant in Temirtau, Kazakhstan.<br /><br />Photo: Tommaso Trevisani, Temirtau, Kazakhstan, 2013<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Coke oven operator. Arcelor Mittal Steel Plant in Temirtau, Kazakhstan.

Photo: Tommaso Trevisani, Temirtau, Kazakhstan, 2013
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>A Somali owned shop in Mombasa old town (<em>mji wa kale</em>). Since the early 1990s many Somali migrants, especially from the Somali port cities, came to Mombasa. As former traders they rented shops, mostly owned by Arab or Asian businesspeople. With the help of the Somali diaspora in the West new houses were built as well, changing the appearance of the historic centre tremendously.<br /><br />Photo: Tabea Scharrer, Mombasa, Kenya, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

A Somali owned shop in Mombasa old town (mji wa kale). Since the early 1990s many Somali migrants, especially from the Somali port cities, came to Mombasa. As former traders they rented shops, mostly owned by Arab or Asian businesspeople. With the help of the Somali diaspora in the West new houses were built as well, changing the appearance of the historic centre tremendously.

Photo: Tabea Scharrer, Mombasa, Kenya, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>F&uuml;r seine Arbeit als Herrenfriseur braucht Herr Manh nicht viel Platz und Ger&auml;t. In den meisten F&auml;llen reicht der Elektrohaarschneider aus, um seinen Kunden einen neuen Schnitt zu verpassen. Er ist schlie&szlig;lich kein Hairstylist, sondern ein einfacher Stra&szlig;enfriseur &ndash; sein &bdquo;Salon&ldquo; befindet sich an der Au&szlig;enwand eines gro&szlig;en Marktgeb&auml;udes.<br /><br />Photo: Kirsten Endres, Lao Cai City, Vietnam, 2012<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Für seine Arbeit als Herrenfriseur braucht Herr Manh nicht viel Platz und Gerät. In den meisten Fällen reicht der Elektrohaarschneider aus, um seinen Kunden einen neuen Schnitt zu verpassen. Er ist schließlich kein Hairstylist, sondern ein einfacher Straßenfriseur – sein „Salon“ befindet sich an der Außenwand eines großen Marktgebäudes.

Photo: Kirsten Endres, Lao Cai City, Vietnam, 2012
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

[weniger]
<p>The Arcelor Mittal Steel Plant in Temirtau was known as the Karaganda Metallurgical Combine (KARMET) in Soviet years. In 2013 it produced 2.96 million tons of steel and had 14,929 employees. In 1996, one year after privatization, production was 3.13 million tons with 29,894 employed people.<br /><br />Photo: Tommaso Trevisani, Temirtau, Kazakhstan, 2014<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

The Arcelor Mittal Steel Plant in Temirtau was known as the Karaganda Metallurgical Combine (KARMET) in Soviet years. In 2013 it produced 2.96 million tons of steel and had 14,929 employees. In 1996, one year after privatization, production was 3.13 million tons with 29,894 employed people.

Photo: Tommaso Trevisani, Temirtau, Kazakhstan, 2014
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

[weniger]
<p>Zur Alltagstracht der Blumen-Hmong Frauen im nordwestlichen Hochland Vietnams geh&ouml;rt eine bunte, mit bestickten B&auml;ndern und Perlenfransen verzierte Bluse. Fr&uuml;her wurden diese Textilien in monatelanger Handarbeit f&uuml;r den Eigengebrauch gefertigt. Heute gibt es auf dem Markt auch maschinell gefertigte Massen&shy;ware aus China.<br /><br />Photo: Kirsten Endres, Provinz Lao Cai, Vietnam, 2010<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Zur Alltagstracht der Blumen-Hmong Frauen im nordwestlichen Hochland Vietnams gehört eine bunte, mit bestickten Bändern und Perlenfransen verzierte Bluse. Früher wurden diese Textilien in monatelanger Handarbeit für den Eigengebrauch gefertigt. Heute gibt es auf dem Markt auch maschinell gefertigte Massen­ware aus China.

Photo: Kirsten Endres, Provinz Lao Cai, Vietnam, 2010
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

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<p>Die Frauen tragen Feuerholz, welches im Pamirgebirge schwer zu beschaffen ist. Die Menschen m&uuml;ssen weite Strecken gehen, um kleine B&uuml;ndel Holz oder Dung zum Heizen zu sammeln.<br /><br />Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Provinz Badachschan, Afghanistan, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Die Frauen tragen Feuerholz, welches im Pamirgebirge schwer zu beschaffen ist. Die Menschen müssen weite Strecken gehen, um kleine Bündel Holz oder Dung zum Heizen zu sammeln.

Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Provinz Badachschan, Afghanistan, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

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<p>Die M&auml;dchen tragen auf einer Staatsparade in Viengxay den traditionellen laotischen Wickelrock, dessen kunstvolle Stickereien individuellen Spielraum und Hervorhebung ethnischer Besonderheit erm&ouml;glichen. Der Ausdruck ethnischer Differenz bleibt in Laos jedoch weitgehend auf Textilkunst und andere traditionelle Handwerke beschr&auml;nkt.<br /><br />Photo: Oliver Tappe, Viengxay, Laos, 2010<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Die Mädchen tragen auf einer Staatsparade in Viengxay den traditionellen laotischen Wickelrock, dessen kunstvolle Stickereien individuellen Spielraum und Hervorhebung ethnischer Besonderheit ermöglichen. Der Ausdruck ethnischer Differenz bleibt in Laos jedoch weitgehend auf Textilkunst und andere traditionelle Handwerke beschränkt.

Photo: Oliver Tappe, Viengxay, Laos, 2010
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

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<p>Verlassene Reihen im staatlichen Hippodrom in Duschanbe nach den zentralen <em>Navruz</em>-Feierlichkeiten. <em>Navruz</em> ist der Name des persischen Neujahrsfestes, das am 21. M&auml;rz gefeiert wird.<br /><br />Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Duschanbe, Tadschikistan, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Verlassene Reihen im staatlichen Hippodrom in Duschanbe nach den zentralen Navruz-Feierlichkeiten. Navruz ist der Name des persischen Neujahrsfestes, das am 21. März gefeiert wird.

Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Duschanbe, Tadschikistan, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

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<p>In Ghana stehen viele Menschen vor der Herausforderung, ein Minimum an vorhandenem Kapital und Material optimal zu nutzen. So werden, wie hier in der Hauptstadt Accra, aus diversen Baustoffen Gesch&auml;ftszentren aus dem Boden gestampft. Sie bieten nicht nur Waren des t&auml;glichen Bedarfs und Dienstleistungen feil, sondern verweisen auch auf Veranstaltungen oder die &Uuml;berzeugungen ihres Betreibers.<br /><br />Photo: Jacqueline Kn&ouml;rr, Accra, Ghana, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

In Ghana stehen viele Menschen vor der Herausforderung, ein Minimum an vorhandenem Kapital und Material optimal zu nutzen. So werden, wie hier in der Hauptstadt Accra, aus diversen Baustoffen Geschäftszentren aus dem Boden gestampft. Sie bieten nicht nur Waren des täglichen Bedarfs und Dienstleistungen feil, sondern verweisen auch auf Veranstaltungen oder die Überzeugungen ihres Betreibers.

Photo: Jacqueline Knörr, Accra, Ghana, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

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<p><em>Rubob, Tambur</em> und <em>Daf</em> sind traditionelle, handgefertigte Musik&shy;instrumente des Pamirgebirges. Zusammen mit einem traditionellen Filzteppich waren sie Gegenstand einer folkloristischen Ausstellung in der tadschikischen Hauptstadt Duschanbe.<br /><br />Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Duschanbe, Tadschikistan, 2011<br />Max-Planck-Institut f&uuml;r ethnologische Forschung</p> Bild vergrößern

Rubob, Tambur und Daf sind traditionelle, handgefertigte Musik­instrumente des Pamirgebirges. Zusammen mit einem traditionellen Filzteppich waren sie Gegenstand einer folkloristischen Ausstellung in der tadschikischen Hauptstadt Duschanbe.

Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Duschanbe, Tadschikistan, 2011
Max-Planck-Institut für ethnologische Forschung

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<p>Sugar paste sculpting requires nimble hands and an eye for detail. Sitting on the square outside Saint Joseph&rsquo;s Cathedral in Hanoi, an old man earns a small income from selling Santa Claus figurines during the Christmas season.<br /><br />Photo: Kirsten Endres, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2010<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Sugar paste sculpting requires nimble hands and an eye for detail. Sitting on the square outside Saint Joseph’s Cathedral in Hanoi, an old man earns a small income from selling Santa Claus figurines during the Christmas season.

Photo: Kirsten Endres, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2010
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>This bowl of chopsticks placed on a distribution box after lunch time shows the blurring boundaries between the public and private sphere in Hanoi: Eating on the streets is a distinct feature of everyday life in Vietnam&rsquo;s capital and Hanoians are willing to drive long distances just to eat at their favourite food stall.<br /><br />Photo: Lisa Barthelmes, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2012<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

This bowl of chopsticks placed on a distribution box after lunch time shows the blurring boundaries between the public and private sphere in Hanoi: Eating on the streets is a distinct feature of everyday life in Vietnam’s capital and Hanoians are willing to drive long distances just to eat at their favourite food stall.

Photo: Lisa Barthelmes, Hanoi, Vietnam, 2012
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>Although one of the most important transport routes in &shy;Sudan, this highway is only single-lane. Speeding, poor safety regulations and lack of infrastructure development contribute to many fatal road accidents.<br /><br />Photo: Timm Sureau, Sudan, 2010<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Although one of the most important transport routes in ­Sudan, this highway is only single-lane. Speeding, poor safety regulations and lack of infrastructure development contribute to many fatal road accidents.

Photo: Timm Sureau, Sudan, 2010
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>Rappers on Nile Street in Khartoum after a long evening of performing rap to the beat provided by a mobile phone. Personal experiences and opinions are expressed in their rap music. <br /><br />Photo: Timm Sureau, Khartoum, Sudan, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Rappers on Nile Street in Khartoum after a long evening of performing rap to the beat provided by a mobile phone. Personal experiences and opinions are expressed in their rap music.

Photo: Timm Sureau, Khartoum, Sudan, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>Nuba Moro Christian women reading from the Moro New Testament along with the preacher during the monthly &ldquo;Women&rsquo;s Day&rdquo; in Church. Literacy in Moro is a gendered strategy for social ascension within Moro society as well as a tool of opposition in an Arab-Islamic state.<br /><br />Photo: Siri Lamoureaux, Khartoum, Sudan, 2012<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Nuba Moro Christian women reading from the Moro New Testament along with the preacher during the monthly “Women’s Day” in Church. Literacy in Moro is a gendered strategy for social ascension within Moro society as well as a tool of opposition in an Arab-Islamic state.

Photo: Siri Lamoureaux, Khartoum, Sudan, 2012
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>Ms Hoa, 68, is a retired labour migrant who lives with her husband in a village in the Nam Dinh Province of Vietnam. She is very affectionate with the silkworms: &ldquo;If you care for them, they will do well. It is very sweet!&rdquo;<br /><br />Photo: Minh Nguyen, Nam Dinh Province, Vietnam, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Ms Hoa, 68, is a retired labour migrant who lives with her husband in a village in the Nam Dinh Province of Vietnam. She is very affectionate with the silkworms: “If you care for them, they will do well. It is very sweet!”

Photo: Minh Nguyen, Nam Dinh Province, Vietnam, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>In celebration of the translation of the Old Testament&rsquo;s &ldquo;Book of Nehemiah&rdquo; into the Moro language, Nuba Moro Church leaders of representative denominations and clans bless the just-&shy;published text. The image illustrates how the social organisation of the Moro ethnic group is transformed into Church hierarchies.<br /><br />Photo: Siri Lamoureaux, Khartoum, Sudan, 2012<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

In celebration of the translation of the Old Testament’s “Book of Nehemiah” into the Moro language, Nuba Moro Church leaders of representative denominations and clans bless the just-­published text. The image illustrates how the social organisation of the Moro ethnic group is transformed into Church hierarchies.

Photo: Siri Lamoureaux, Khartoum, Sudan, 2012
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>State celebrations of <em>Navruz</em>, the Persian New Year. The central ceremony was held at the hippodrome in the presence of the Tajik president. Students of local universities standing in front of images of traditional <em>suzanies</em>, embroidered fabrics with patterns characteristic for various regions.<br /><br />Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Dushanbe, Tajikistan, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

State celebrations of Navruz, the Persian New Year. The central ceremony was held at the hippodrome in the presence of the Tajik president. Students of local universities standing in front of images of traditional suzanies, embroidered fabrics with patterns characteristic for various regions.

Photo: Małgorzata Biczyk, Dushanbe, Tajikistan, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>Traditional practices of popular Islam are resilient in Central Asia, despite the interventions of secular authorities. At the famous shrine of Imam Jafar Sadiq at Niya in southern Xinjiang, even minor, more recent tombs in the surrounding desert are adorned with the votive rags of pilgrims.<br /><br />Photo: Chris Hann, Minfeng County, People&rsquo;s Republic of China, 2005<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Traditional practices of popular Islam are resilient in Central Asia, despite the interventions of secular authorities. At the famous shrine of Imam Jafar Sadiq at Niya in southern Xinjiang, even minor, more recent tombs in the surrounding desert are adorned with the votive rags of pilgrims.

Photo: Chris Hann, Minfeng County, People’s Republic of China, 2005
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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<p>Supply lines getting serviced in Kyoto. As in other Japanese cities, transformers and a dense maze of wires are suspended above the streets rather than placed on the sidewalks for the lack of space.<br /><br />Photo: Christoph Brumann, Kyoto, Japan, 2011<br />Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology</p> Bild vergrößern

Supply lines getting serviced in Kyoto. As in other Japanese cities, transformers and a dense maze of wires are suspended above the streets rather than placed on the sidewalks for the lack of space.

Photo: Christoph Brumann, Kyoto, Japan, 2011
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

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