Flemming Kaul and Franҫois Bertemes at the ANARCHIE distinguished lecture 2016 Zoom Image
Flemming Kaul and Franҫois Bertemes at the ANARCHIE distinguished lecture 2016
László Kürti at the opening lecture of the academic year 2015 / 2016 Zoom Image
László Kürti at the opening lecture of the academic year 2015 / 2016
Inaugural lecture of the IMPRS ANARCHIE 2012 Zoom Image
Inaugural lecture of the IMPRS ANARCHIE 2012

News Archive

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Online now! The video of the IMPRS ANARCHIE Autumn School's distinguished lecture by the Danish archaeologist Flemming Kaul

Today, it seems straightforward to work with Bronze Age religion – and Prehistoric religion – even when considering a narrow definition of religion, including trans-empirical powers. However, not many years ago, research in Prehistoric religion had much lower prestige among researchers.
Going back through the history of research, some interesting fluctuations can be observed related to the willingness of working with and interpreting in the sphere of religion. A lack of interest in religious explanations is marked around 1875 and 1975, while the interest in religious explanations peaks around 1925 and is seemingly at its highest again after 2000. Now, the acceptance level for incorporating interpretations related to religion seems extremely high, and many concurrent approaches are in play. Considering Bronze Age iconography, many themes can be linked to a cyclical sun mythology: Chaos powers of the underworld, fragments of a creation myth, anthropomorfisation of the sun god; even research into the prospects for a Bronze Age afterlife in the “Sonnenbarke” seems possible.

Prehistoric Religion-Bronze Age Religion-A Difficult Topic of Research?

Distinguished lecture of the IMPRS ANARCHIE by the Danish archaeologist Flemming Kaul Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology on 9th of November 2016 at 18:00

Prehistoric Religion-Bronze Age Religion-A Difficult Topic of Research?

Distinguished lecture of the IMPRS ANARCHIE by the Danish archaeologist Flemming Kaul
Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology on 9th of November 2016 at 18:00
Poster

Today, it seems straightforward to work with Bronze Age religion – and Prehistoric religion – even when considering a narrow definition of religion, including trans-empirical powers. However, not many years ago, research in Prehistoric religion had much lower prestige among researchers.
Going back through the history of research, some interesting fluctuations can be observed related to the willingness of working with and interpreting in the sphere of religion. A lack of interest in religious explanations is marked around 1875 and 1975, while the interest in religious explanations peaks around 1925 and is seemingly at its highest again after 2000.
Now, the acceptance level for incorporating interpretations related to religion seems extremely high, and many concurrent approaches are in play. Considering Bronze Age iconography, many themes can be linked to a cyclical sun mythology: Chaos powers of the underworld, fragments of a creation myth, anthropomorfisation of the sun god; even research into the prospects for a Bronze Age afterlife in the “Sonnenbarke” seems possible.

The Distinguished Lecture opens the IMPRS ANARCHIE Autumn School 2016 on "Religion and Ritual" which takes place on the 10th-11th of November at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology

Programme Autumn School 2016


Summer School, Weimar, 18-20 July 2016
Social and economic transformations in Eurasia in the longue durée
Programme


Winter School, Wittenberg, 1-3 February 2016
Programme


Pulitzer prize winner David Kertzer will deliver a guest lecture on

Anthropology, Demography, and History

in the seminar “The Determinants of Social Change” at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology on 9th November 2015 at 6:00 p.m.

Over the past two decades anthropological demography has emerged both as a specialty within anthropology and as a recognised part of demography. Special doctoral programmes sprang up in the United States, a regular committee of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population was devoted to the field, and meetings of the Population Association of America began to feature sessions focusing on anthropological work. Yet obstacles remained. Anthropologists working in demography often found themselves caught between a strong anti-positivist sentiment among many anthropologists and demographers suspicious of ethnographic research as a methodology and uncomfortable at the relentless deconstruction of analytical categories that characterises anthropology.

Social anthropology’s intersections with demography are many, although often anthropologists working on issues of demographic interest are unaware of the connections. This presentation examines some of these connections, and in doing so pays particular attention to the relations of anthropology to history, and the relevance of demography to this anthropology/history nexus. In conclusion, as an example of the richness and importance of anthropological demography, the example of the use of identity categories in demographic research is briefly considered.

Poster


The third cohort of the IMPRS ANARCHIE will be officially launched on 12 October 2015 at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology at 6:00 p.m. László Kürti from the University of Miskolc will lecture on:

Ethnography, History and the New Nomadism in Hungary

The policy of the Hungarian state towards commemorations, rituals and historic pageantry is complex, ambivalent, and unpredictable.
The history of nomadism, which at first glance has little connection to modern Hungary, has been used by different social actors to interpret and organise social relations, the interaction between state and civil society and national identity. Hungarian „conquest-type” nomadism identifies historical and legendary elements of the 9-10th centuries. It also builds on previous nomadic incursions to Central Europe by Asiatic tribes, particularly the Scythians, Avars and the Huns. In contrast, some communities of central Hungary have been rekindling interest in a distinct Turkic and Iranian nomadic heritage which dates back to the 13-14th centuries.
Based on extensive fieldwork in Hungary in the past two decades, the lecture will explore the creative social engineering of various elites who reconstruct nomadic histories in order to fashion local identities and a new national one. At the same time the lecturer will draw out the implications of these results for historical and anthropological scholarship.

Distinguished lecture


Summer School, Erfurt, 17-19 July 2015
Religion and Ritual: A Matter of Power. Interdisciplinary Approaches
Programme


Winter School, Wittenberg, 9-11 February 2015
Programme


Summer School, Naumburg, 19-21 July 2013
Identities in (Ex)Change: Interdisciplinary Approaches and Challenges
Programme


Winter School, Wittenberg, 5-7 February 2013
Programme


Launch of the International Max Planck Research School for the Anthropology, Archaeology and History of Eurasia (IMPRS ANARCHIE)

The IMPRS ANARCHIE will be officially launched on 15 October 2012 at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology at 6:00 p. m.

Stephen Shennan, Director of the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, will lecture on:

Patterns of long-term change in the European Neolithic

The talk will show that although the appearance of farming led to increased populations in Europe these were not sustained. Regional populations underwent a pattern of 'boom and bust'. These fluctuations had a major impact on social, economic and cultural patterns, including the building of monumental tombs and enclosures, the exploitation of flint resources and the spatial and temporal patterns recognised by traditional culture history. It will be suggested that describing and explaining 'big pictures' is an appropriate goal for a unified archaeological and anthropological approach to European prehistory and that the integrative theoretical perspective of 'cultural evolution' as developed over the last 30 years by Boyd and Richerson and many others offers a productive framework for achieving it.

Distinguished lecture

 
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