Mobile Livelihoods

Mobile Livelihoods

Many people worldwide rely on mobility for their livelihood: drivers, delivery workers, street vendors, maintenance technicians of long-distance operation systems, children who live on the street, and so many more. Mobility, in effect, is their main means of work — and survival. Those who rely on mobility either facilitate the movement of others (e.g. drivers) or move on others’ behalf (e.g. delivery riders). Admittedly one of the most “traditional” lifestyles, mobile livelihoods today are increasingly mediated through large digital platforms. Can mobility be conceptualized as a form of labour? How can its value be measured?


Amazon’s warehouse and delivery workers became an essential and rapidly expanding workforce in the United States during the pandemic. Amongst various categories of workers, protest and legal mobilization arose as part of a movement to protect Amazon employees in the mobile sector, even while so much else of the country was in lockdown. — Danielle Douglas
The government of Jordan provided some emergency assistance to migrant workers during the pandemic, but migrants’ lack of formal employment impeded the implementation. — Shaddin Almasri
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