Linked and Distributed Mobilities

Linked and Distributed Mobilities

Movements of people, things, information, and energy are inter-related. Mobilities are distributed too, for instance residents’ immobility during the COVID pandemic 2020-21 relied on the heightened mobility of essential workers, while the reduction of human movement in general resulted in the increasing mobility of animals. Furthermore, businesses, governments and other actors are creating new connections among movements, through technological innovation, logistical development, environmental interventions and multispecies imagination. Migration infrastructure conditions mobilities through the interlinkages, bringing knowledge and practice into new relations.


afe migration for low-skilled workers in the Mekong region often means “finding a good broker”. Likewise, the securitization of mobility is mediated by actors, technologies, and devices, resulting in impacts on migrants and citizens that are multiple and even stretch far beyond mobility. — Sverre Molland, Biao Xiang
Human and non-human mobilities are interlinked not only in practice, but also in our perception. Rethinking our understandings about the movements of plants and animals may bring in new perspectives in thinking human mobility and conviviality. — Julia Morris, Biao Xiang
In this installment of MoLab Conversation, Julia Morris and Biao Xiang discuss a new global trend that non-human entities play a part in the governance of migration. Nature conservation became a means of territorialization and border reinforcement. Resource management and migration management merge in border-making.
Continuing their discussion into “linked mobilities,” In this video Julia Morris and Biao Xiang explore the complex impacts of environmental protection policies on the mobility of humans and non-humans.
In this video, Julia Morris and Biao Xiang explore MoLab’s new theme “linked Mobilities.” They discuss how projects around phosphate extraction and refugee processing in the Republic of Nauru, apparently unrelated, overlap and enable one another’s longevity. Historical memory plays a big part, as much as mutating legal and governance systems.
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