Mobility Events

Mobility Events

Political demonstrations, pilgrimage, carnivals, music festivals, scouting, and dating are mobility events: events based on mobilities. Events break with daily routine. They intensify some aspects of the general social condition and undermine others. Through mobility events we constantly reorganize our social lives and reform our collective consciousness.


What kind of politics emerged in the context of the pandemic? The transformative dimension of power figures as a crucial aspect of politics in times of a crisis. — Ranabir Samaddar, Biao Xiang
Lockdown restrictions have increased the share of reproductive labour in domestic space, with disproportionate impacts for women. This entry examines that phenomenon in the context of Australia and Aotearoa-New Zealand. — Vidya Ramachandran
Marrying during the pandemic has necessitated various adaptations of custom. — Vidya Ramachandran
COVID-19 has propelled vital conversations about race and racism to the forefront of many societies. In Australia and Aotearoa-New Zealand, violence and discrimination against peoples of Asian descent has escalated during the pandemic. These increasing hostilities, alongside travel restrictions, will likely affect future mobilities between the regions. — Vidya Ramachandran
Indian government launched an unprecedented repatriation programme during the Covid pandemic and has brought nearly 4 million overseas Indian citizens home as of mid December 2020. — S. Irudaya Rajan, H. Arokkiaraj
In Australia, COVID-19’s impacts on everyday urban life may have provoked interest in urban-rural migration, raising important questions about (im)mobility and environmental justice in the region as a whole. — Vidya Ramachandran
How should we think, rather than simply react—emotionally or ideologically—in the middle of crises? — Ranabir Samaddar, Biao Xiang
During the COVID-19 pandemic, lockdown and social distancing restrictions have produced an increase in the use of dating apps – often as a means of social connection, rather than seeking partnership. New practices of dating, including ‘walking dates’, have also emerged, while lockdown’s impacts on intimate relationships have provoked resistance from some corners. — Vidya Ramachandran
Lockdown and social distancing restrictions have impacted women’s experiences of domestic violence, and complicated their access to frontline support services. The entry examines this phenomenon in the context of Australia and Aotearoa-New Zealand. — Vidya Ramachandran
The measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 have led to an increase in violence against women in Turkey, as victims and perpetrators are locked down together and access to protection grows more difficult. Furthermore, those convicted of violence against women have been released from prisons and sent back to their homes. — Esra Demirkol
After the African Leadership University closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic and classes resumed online, students reported gendered differences in the family expectations and assignation of domestic duties that disproportionately affected female students. — Chiedza Mutsaka Skyum
Border restrictions introduced in response to the pandemic have complicated citizens’ abilities to depart from, and return to, their countries of nationality. — Vidya Ramachandran
Pandemic-related immobilities have provided fertile ground for protest mobility, offering one explanation for the sustained protests following the death of George Floyd in May 2020. — Angela Remus
The closure of childcare facilities and schools has resulted in the immobilization of many children in the home. As a result, some mothers are likely to experience reduced mobility as a result of the pandemic. This entry explores which mothers are most likely to experience this immobility. — Angela Remus
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